Evropský parlament a piráti

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Lukas.Dolezal
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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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Fight against facial recognition hits wall across the West

Efforts to check the spread of face-scanning technology are meeting resistance on both sides of the Atlantic.

By Janosch Delcker and Cristiano Lima

12/27/19, 5:32 PM CET, Updated 12/30/19, 12:19 PM CET

Obrázek
Police and security forces across the West are rapidly testing or rolling out facial-recognition technology | Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Face-scanning technology is inspiring a wave of privacy fears as the software creeps into every corner of life in the United States and Europe — at border crossings, on police vehicles and in stadiums, airports and high schools. But efforts to check its spread are hitting a wall of resistance on both sides of the Atlantic.

One big reason: Western governments are embracing this technology for their own use, valuing security and data collection over privacy and civil liberties. And in Washington, U.S. President Donald Trump’s impeachment and the death of a key civil rights and privacy champion have snarled expectations for a congressional drive to enact restrictions.

The result is an impasse that has left tech companies largely in control of where and how to deploy facial recognition, which they have sold to police agencies and embedded in consumers’ apps and smartphones. The stalemate has persisted even in Europe’s most privacy-minded countries, such as Germany, and despite a bipartisan U.S. alliance of civil-libertarian Democrats and Republicans.

Advocates for tighter regulations point to China as an example of the technology’s nightmare potential, amid reports authorities are using it to indiscriminately track citizens in public, identify pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong and oppress millions of Muslim Uighurs in Xinjiang. Current implementations of the software also perpetuate racial bias by misidentifying people of color far more frequently than white people, according to a U.S. government study released just before Congress left town for Christmas.

“Facial recognition needs to be stopped before a fait accompli is established,” Patrick Breyer, a member of the European Parliament for the Pirate Party Germany, told POLITICO.

"The use of facial recognition technology poses a staggering threat to Americans’ privacy," Democratic Senator Ed Markey, who is prepping legislation to crack down on the software, said in June.

But police and security forces across the West are still rapidly testing or rolling out the technology, adopting it as an inexpensive way to keep tabs on large groups of people. Cameras and artificial intelligence that can identify people based on their facial features are also showing up at border crossings, on police vehicles, at the entrances to stadiums and even in some high schools in the U.S. and Europe, where they are used to identify students. Such examples far outnumber the facial recognition bans enacted in San Francisco and some other U.S. cities.

In Washington, a once-promising bipartisan push in the House of Representatives to limit the federal government's use of facial recognition has stalled for unrelated reasons, including the death of former House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings and acrimony over impeachment. And in the Senate, more limited proposals to rein in federal agencies' use of the technology have been slow to pick up support.

But privacy activists are drawing a broader lesson from governments’ failure to check the technology’s spread, saying it is eroding the differences between the way Western governments and China approach public surveillance.

“There is growing evidence that the U.S. is increasingly using AI in oppressive and harmful ways that echo China’s use,” AI Now, a research group at New York University, wrote in a report published this month that underscored the spread of "invasive" artificial intelligence technology.

'Fundamental rights'

In both the U.S. and Europe, the stuttering progress of efforts to regulate facial recognition stems from a blend of reluctance by security-obsessed governments and setbacks that have stymied lawmakers’ focus.

The latter obstacles have included the death in October of Cummings, whose panel had seemed poised to craft bipartisan legislation restricting face-scanning by federal agencies. Several top Democrats and Republicans on the committee have also been embroiled in the monthslong dispute over Trump's impeachment and upcoming Senate trial.

Democratic and Republican lawmakers alike acknowledged in interviews with POLITICO that the effort has stalled.

"Unfortunately impeachment has sucked all the energy out of the room," Republican Senator Stephen Lynch, who chairs the Oversight National Security Subcommittee, said this month.

"There hasn't been anything that's happened right now. … Elijah's death put that on hold," said Senator Mark Meadows of North Carolina, the top Republican on the Oversight Government Operations Subcommittee.

In the European Union, meanwhile, calls by top leaders for quick action on regulating artificial intelligence aren’t guaranteed to result in any binding EU-wide restrictions.

Even the strict limits on gathering of “sensitive data" in the EU’s premier privacy rule, the General Data Protection Regulation, contain a broad carve-out for public authorities that can collect sensitive biometric data if they can justify it. That loophole has allowed facial recognition technology to pop up in locations such as a major Berlin train station, where an experimental project by the authorities has scanned tens of thousands of passersby.

Even so, Breyer said he is confident Europe will ultimately end up with stricter limits on facial recognition than the United States. The lawmaker argues that the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights, which grants every European citizen “the right to the protection of personal data concerning him or her,” will protect Europeans from indiscriminate use of facial recognition, while the U.S. Constitution says nothing to that effect, and will not.

“In the U.S., if you’re moving around public spaces, there essentially is no right to privacy,” said Breyer, who was trained as a lawyer.

“Here, it’s the other way around: There is a basic right to data protection and informational self-determination, which means that every piece of data that’s collected and processed about us means an intrusion into our basic rights, and [law enforcement agencies] can only do that on a legal basis, and after being granted permission.”
Zdroj a celý článek: https://www.politico.eu/article/fight-a ... a1sh6kP0pU
Tito uživatelé poděkovali autorovi Lukas.Dolezal za příspěvek:
Janka.Michailidu

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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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@Mikulas.Peksa v Událostech, komentářích 20. 2. 2020 ohledně mimořádného summitu o rozpočtu.
Tito uživatelé poděkovali autorovi Lukas.Dolezal za příspěvky (celkem 3):
Mikulas.Peksa, Filip.Krska, Dalibor.Zahora

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EP News Hub

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Agregátor tweetů EP News Hub. Lze nastavit filtry samotného eurosposlance, země, skupiny v EP či tiskových zpráv z EP.

• Tweety všech pirátských europoslanců zde.

• Tweety všech europoslanců z Greens/EFA zde.

• Tweety všech českých europoslanců zde.
Tito uživatelé poděkovali autorovi Lukas.Dolezal za příspěvky (celkem 2):
Vojtech.Pikal, Dalibor.Zahora

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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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Světový mír a tetování z Harryho Pottera. Pojmenovávám věci tak, jak jsou, říká europoslankyně za Piráty Gregorová
https://archiv.ihned.cz/c7-66731200-rer ... UnuygHth5w
Tito uživatelé poděkovali autorovi Dalibor.Zahora za příspěvek:
Ondrej.Profant
zástupce KMO Sčk, zakládající člen, bývalý člen KK, více na profilu wiki.pirati.cz, aktuální texty najdete na Deník Referendum, více jsem na twitteru @daliborzz než na FB fb.com/dlbrz t. 773 993 465

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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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Místopředseda Europarlamentu Kolaja čeká na výsledky testů

Brno - Místopředseda Evropského parlamentu a europoslanec Marcel Kolaja (Piráti) je v karanténě v Brně a čeká na výsledky testů na koronavirus. Ve čtvrtek dopoledne přiletěl do Prahy z Bruselu, večer začal mít zdravotní potíže, řekl Kolaja ČTK.

"Přiletěl jsem v 11:00 z Bruselu, odjel jsem do Brna. Večer jsem začal mít kašel a stoupla mi teplota. Proto jsem požádal o otestování, pracovník Krajské hygienické stanice rozhodl, že mě přijede někdo otestovat domů," uvedl Kolaja. Odběr podstoupil v pátek odpoledne, na výsledky zatím čeká.

O svých zdravotních problémech kromě hygieniků informoval i své kolegy. "V tomto to máme zjednodušené, protože spolu komunikujeme prostřednictvím chatu, kde jsou připojeni všichni členové a pracovníci delegace evropských Pirátů," uvedl Kolaja s tím, že rodinu nemá a izolaci od ní tedy řešit nemusí.

Kdy výsledky testů dostane, netuší. "Bylo mi řečeno, že pokud se mi do pondělka nebo úterka s výsledky neozvou, mám jim volat," podotkl s tím, že se doma léčí běžnými prostředky a jeho stav se nezhoršuje.

Pracovní povinnosti na příští týden řešit nemusí, protože Evropský parlament kvůli šíření koronaviru vyhlásil takzvaný bílý týden, kdy zrušil všechna zasedání a jednání. "Máme pouze na středu domluvenou virtuální schůzku koordinátorů pro vnitřní trh a ochranu spotřebitele," řekl Kolaja.

Belgie je jednou z patnácti zemí, které česká vláda označila za rizikové, platí do nich zákaz cestování a jejich občané nesmí cestovat do České republiky. Omezení se nevztahuje na cizince s dlouhodobým pobytem v Česku a na ty, jejichž příjezd by byl v zájmu České republiky.

V Česku už je 150 pacientů, u nichž testy potvrdily onemocnění COVID-19. Alespoň jeden je v každém kraji, nejvíce nemocných má Praha, Středočeský a Ústecký kraj. Kvůli ochraně zdraví a zpomalení šíření nemoci vyhlásila ve čtvrtek vláda na 30 dnů nouzový stav na celém území České republiky. O půlnoci se uzavřely hranice s Rakouskem a Německem. Ráno zůstaly zavřené obchody s výjimkou potravin, lékáren, drogerií a také třeba krmiv.

Zdroj: Místopředseda Europarlamentu Kolaja čeká na výsledky testů

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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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Marcel v živém vstupu Studia 6 na ČT24 o hlasování EP v čase koronaviru.

Čas: 2:20:00 - 2:31:22

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Re: Evropský parlament a piráti

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EU Parliament’s work from home measures are flawed, says vice president

Marcel Kolaja says the system needs changing at the latest by the summer in order to boost security.

By Laurens Cerulus

The European Parliament's emergency systems to hold meetings and cast votes during the coronavirus outbreak has flaws and is vulnerable to manipulation, its vice president responsible for information technologies told POLITICO in an interview.

Parliament's emergency measures, passed in March, helped make some urgent calls on how to help stop the spread of the coronavirus across the Continent.

"It's obvious that the situation is unprecedented ... Parliament had to come up with a temporary solution," said Marcel Kolaja, a member of the Czech Pirate Party and Greens group, who oversees the institution's IT, digital and telecom policy.

But, he said, that system needs changing at the latest by the summer in order to boost security and confidentiality of communication.

The system now in place included having members of the European Parliament vote over email, which Kolaja called "a huge space for manipulation" and that relies on MEPs having to go check the voting record to make sure their ballot was registered correctly.

The crisis is also pushing some members to use online chat apps and videoconferencing tools that are based outside of the EU.

According to Kolaja, "we need to understand that if you have a provider of such service that is based in a different jurisdiction, laws of the establishment of that company apply. We need to make sure that no information leaks through that platform."

How do you evaluate the security of how Parliament is now working, during this lockdown period?

Suddenly Parliament was in a situation where MEPs were pretty much all in their home countries. It also became apparent that there is an imminent need to vote on critical measures when it comes to mitigating the impact of the pandemic.

Parliament had to very quickly come up with a temporary solution how to work. The Bureau [of members overseeing the institution's internal workings] decided for a temporary system on voting via email.

We should use a remote e-voting system only in situations like this, only for urgent matters.

I personally insisted that the decision of the Bureau needed to have a clear sunset clause. That's why it ends end-July.

Would you consider the email voting system secure?

The system we currently have can be very much improved.

MEPs have to print their ballot, sign and scan it and send it back over email, where there is a huge space for manipulation. The guarantee that the vote was not manipulated basically lies in procedural measures: MEPs have to verify that their vote has been correctly registered.

We should deploy a system to make it possible to digitally sign the vote by the MEP. Parliament services are working on such a solution.

How are you holding your virtual meetings?

The Parliament is very specific [in its needs]. That's because of security and confidentiality of information. However, it's also because of the specificities of how Parliament works [like] when the chair gives the floor to a member and when there's a specific order of the meeting that we must follow. The Parliament's official meetings also need to be translated and interpreted into several languages.

In the end, you find out that there's not too many tools on the market that fulfill your needs. Parliament decided to go for a solution provided as a service. The system is called Interactio.

I think it has a lot of room for improvements. One is that [MEPs] are required to use Apple products, iPhones or iPads. We should remove that barrier ... to be able to work with open-source software so that we are not locked into one particular technology of one particular company.

Secondly, in the long run I believe the Parliament should be using a system that is fully hosted in-house.

Has Parliament advised its members on the use of videoconferencing application Zoom, which has come under fire for its cybersecurity flaws?

There have been concerns raised and information shared that using Zoom imposes certain security threats.

We need to understand that if you have a provider of such service that is based in a different jurisdiction, laws of the establishment of that company apply. We need to make sure that no information leaks through that platform.

If it's a platform established in the country where the company has the obligation to provide data to the government or intelligence agencies — and where it can also be given a gag order so that they cannot even tell anyone that this is happening — this is a risk. Everyone who shares anything via that platform needs to understand this.

The system should in the long run be hosted on the premises of the Parliament. And Parliament should get into a situation where it provides solutions that are hosted in-house, so we don't have to deal with these types of issues.

For messaging applications, too, Parliament should deploy its own platform. It can be one of the open-source platforms available. It would be great if it had end-to-end encryption. It should be encouraged by Parliament for employees to use such a system over those hosted by third parties.

The Commission recently recommended its staff use end-to-end encrypted app Signal for public conversations. Would you support this?

I understand the Commission wanted to improve what's been happening. Of course there are a lot of services that are a lot worse than Signal. But it still is a centralized system that would be hosted outside of Parliament, and even outside of [EU] jurisdiction. And there's no control over what the company does with the data.

How will this change how Parliament works, when the crisis is over?

It can fundamentally change how Parliament is prepared for such situations.

I would like that this crisis changes what Parliament provides to MEPs and employees, including chat systems and videoconferencing systems, so they can use these systems in normal times.

The crisis for us is a huge opportunity to understand these issues [of security and confidentiality] more, when we normally don't pay attention to this.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.
Zdroj: https://www.politico.eu/article/coronav ... Uq6bMq49KU
Tito uživatelé poděkovali autorovi Lukas.Dolezal za příspěvky (celkem 2):
Ivor.Kollar, Filip.Krska

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